Triangle

Course overview

Start your pharmacy career with a world top 5 school two years in a row*. Our teaching, learning materials and student support back this incredible ranking.

Current students have co-designed our teaching to shape the future of your lessons. We integrate professional practice, drug prescribing and patient skills across therapeutic themes.

Learn how to assess, speak and treat a patient (with actors). Role-play how to speak to different professionals in our very own Simulated Clinical Suite. It's located in the local hospital, the Queen's Medical Centre.

Gain clinical interaction experience through placements in the community, GP and hospital pharmacies. You will develop your skills to advise patients and healthcare professionals on the safe and effective use of medicines.

You will run your own simulated pharmacy. This will be in a fully immersive commercial and patient-centred clinical environment. Practise patient counselling, drug dispensing and medicine prescribing.

Fly to multiple places like Malaysia, Canada and Australia for your study abroad and research project. MPharm student Nora went to our Malaysia campus. "There was nicer weather. It was quite diverse. Different cultures to see around you, and different forms of treatments."

We will prepare you for the new one year Foundation Training employment. You will need to complete this following graduation to become a registered Pharmacist.

* QS World University Rankings by Subject 2022 and 2021.

Why choose this course?

Top 5

in the world for pharmacy and pharmacology

QS World University Rankings by Subject 2022 and 2021

Research project

Travel in your third year to places like Australia, Italy or Canada

Study abroad

Fly to our Malaysia campus for all or part of your second year

Accredited

by the General Pharmaceutical Council

3rd in the UK

for pharmacy and pharmacology two years in a row

QS World Rankings by Subject for 2022 and 2021

Dedicated

Personal Tutor, who will remain with you through the course

Opportunities

to attend pharmacy conferences


Entry requirements

All candidates are considered on an individual basis and we accept a broad range of qualifications. The entrance requirements below apply to 2023 entry.

UK entry requirements
A level AAB

Please note: Applicants whose backgrounds or personal circumstances have impacted their academic performance may receive a reduced offer. Please see our contextual admissions policy for more information.

IB score 34 with 6,6,5 in three Higher Level subjects including 6 in Higher Level chemistry and 6 or 5 in one of Higher Level maths, biology, or physics or Higher Level maths, biology, or physics.

A levels

  • AAB, including chemistry and at least one further science A level from biology, maths or physics
  • A pass in the practical element of science subjects is required if assessed separately
  • The third A level can be any subject apart from general studies, critical thinking and citizenship which are not accepted

GCSEs

  • Maths 5 (B) or above
  • English 5 (B) or above

Re-sits

The minimum entry and all first re-sit attempts need to be at A level grade: BCC.
Please note if you have received Centre/Teacher assessed grades in 2020 or 2021, you will not be required to meet this resit policy.

We will consider all extenuating circumstances that might have affected performance and will do this on a case-by-case basis. Please contact us for further support on this.

Interviews

We initially shortlist based on your UCAS application and grades. The next step is an interview. We use a multi-mini interview (MMI) format. The MMI is a series of short interviews, each around 5 minutes that explore and engage your communication skills, interest in pharmacy and scenario based discussion on ethics and professional values and general understanding of how medicines work. It is an interactive process that gives you further insight into being a pharmacist. Further information about the interview process is on our website.

Other requirements

Standards for pharmacy professionals

Pharmacy is one of the registered healthcare professions and carries both privileges and responsibilities. You are expected to conduct yourself professionally at all times. The Standards for Pharmacy Professionals apply to all pharmacy students from the first day of the course to the day of graduation and applies both on and off campus.

The school has fitness to practise procedures in place for pharmacy students and you will be given more information about these when you join the course.

The Standards for Pharmacy Professionals and the requirement for fitness to practise procedures are issued by the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC). However, you should note that the GPhC is not an adjudicator or appeal body, and will not be able to offer prospective registration advice.

The GPhC is the final decision maker in relation to an individual's eligibility to:

  • enter pharmacist Foundation training
  • register as a pharmacist

The GPhC reserves the right to set aside a school's fitness to practise decision, if there are grounds for doing so, when making either of these decisions.

The GPhC has its own requirements for registration as a pharmacist, including making its own health and good character checks. It also has its own fitness to practise procedures for registered pharmacists. The GPhC can refuse to register a student as a Foundation or pharmacist if a check is failed, even if previous checks have been passed.

As a member of the Pharmacy Schools Council, the school makes use of the Excluded Students Database to identify applicants who have been excluded from a professional degree programme on grounds of fitness to practice. Applications from applicants who appear on the Database will be considered on an individual basis.

Health questionnaire

When you accept your offer, the school will send out a health questionnaire with further instructions before you join us. You do not need to do anything else regarding a health check before this time.

Character checks

UK-based applicants will be asked to complete and return a Disclosure Barring Service (DBS) application form. It will be sent to you when you meet your offer with instructions on how to complete it.

Non-UK based applicants will be required to provide us with a Certificate of Good Conduct and Character. This will need to be requested from a formal authority like the police, or the Foreign Affairs Department or equivalent. It should include any information on any criminal convictions that you have, or simply confirm that you don't have any.

We encourage students to discuss any problems or concerns with us as soon as possible so that we can support and advise you appropriately. If you have any questions or concerns regarding any of the above, then please contact us.

Notes for applicants

We are looking for strong academic qualifications as well as a commitment to a career as a healthcare professional. Your personal statement is your opportunity to make yourself stand out from the crowd. We want to know what interests you about being a healthcare professional so it is worth reflecting on any related reading that you have done, any work experience and/or any extracurricular activities that you do. For additional information regarding writing your personal statement, please see the UCAS website.

Entry to our MPharm is always into year one, with no exceptions.

We do not accept lower grade A levels alongside an incomplete or partial degree.

We welcome applications from candidates who would like to defer entry until the following academic year.

For candidates who are re-sitting a full year, the standard offer will remain as AAB.

Foundation progression options

If you don't meet our entry requirements there is the option to study the science foundation programme. If you successfully pass the year, you can progress to the Master of Pharmacy or Pharmaceutical Sciences courses. There is a course for UK students and one for EU/international students.

Mature Students

At the University of Nottingham, we have a valuable community of mature students and we appreciate their contribution to the wider student population. You can find lots of useful information on the mature students webpage.

Learning and assessment

How you will learn

Teaching methods

  • Lab sessions
  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Tutorials
  • Workshops
  • Placements
  • Problem classes

How you will be assessed

Guidance will be given on how your work is assessed. Through workshops, on-line forums and Q&A sessions, we will work together to prepare you for all assessments. Your work will be marked in a timely manner and you will receive regular feedback. All teaching blocks must be passed for progression to the next year and overall final mark and degree classification. Pass marks vary according to the teaching block and can range from a minimum of 40% through to 100%, which is required for the continuing professional development teaching block.

Your final degree classification will be based on marks gained for your second and subsequent years of study. Year two is worth 20% with years three and four worth 40% each.

Assessment methods

  • Coursework
  • Group project
  • Lab reports
  • Oral exam
  • Poster presentation
  • Research project
  • Written exam

Contact time and study hours

As a guide, one credit equals approximately 10 hours of work. You will spend around half of your time in lectures, tutorials, workshops, case-studies, practical classes and placements. The remaining time will be completed as independent study.

Tutorial sessions are built into the timetable and there are several group and individual meetings timetabled throughout the year. You can also arrange additional meetings with your tutor.

Core modules are typically delivered by professors, assistant and associate professors or teaching practitioners (practising pharmacists who also teach). Practical and laboratory skills teaching blocks may be supported by postgraduate teaching assistant.

For each teaching block there are feedback sessions and workshops with teaching block conveners, year heads, the Course Director and the Head of School. 

Study abroad

You can choose to study abroad at multiple times during your degree programme including part or all of your second year at University of Nottingham Malaysia or doing your third year research project abroad.

Benefits of studying abroad

Students who choose to study abroad are more likely to achieve a first-class degree, secure a graduate-level job, and earn more on average than students who did not (Gone International: Rising Aspirations, Universities UK International, 2019).

  • Gain global perspective of pharmacy
  • Meet new people from all over the world
  • Explore a new culture
  • Improve your communication skills, confidence and independence

We provide support throughout the process, including an academic advisor and a dedicated team to help you with the practicalities.

University of Nottingham Malaysia

You can apply to spend all or part of your second year studying at the University of Nottingham Malaysia. All teaching is in English and you'll study similar modules to those at the UK campus. This means that you can still complete your degree within the standard timeframe.

Read about Zeliha's experience studying in Malaysia.

Third-year research project abroad

You can apply to complete your third year research project abroad during the second semester. Available destinations change each year but possible destinations include:

  • Australia
  • France
  • Italy
  • University of Nottingham Malaysia
  • New Zealand
  • Canada
  • Singapore

Finance

You’ll pay a reduced tuition fee for the time that you’re abroad. The University also offers a range of funding opportunities, as well as external funding being available.

 

Important Information

Study Abroad opportunities are subject to students meeting minimum academic requirements. Opportunities may change at any time for a number of reasons, including curriculum developments, changes to arrangements with partner universities, travel restrictions or other circumstances outside of the University’s control. Every effort will be made to update information as quickly as possible should a change occur.

Placements

In each year of the course you will go on professional placements. These could include community pharmacies and hospitals. You'll also go on insight visits that provide interprofessional experiences. The majority of placements are in Nottinghamshire. You may also be allocated to placements in Derbyshire and Leicestershire. All placements are accessible by public transport.

Study Abroad and the Year in Industry are subject to students meeting minimum academic requirements. Opportunities may change at any time for a number of reasons, including curriculum developments, changes to arrangements with partner universities, travel restrictions or other circumstances outside of the university’s control. Every effort will be made to update information as quickly as possible should a change occur.

Introduction to the School of Pharmacy

See what it's like inside our school

Modules

Teaching blocks

In semester one you will explore the foundation science and professionalism that underpin pharmacy. There will be a combination of teaching, placement and assessments. They all interlink to help get the most out of a simulated patient environment as a pharmacist.

This semester also supports your transition to living and studying university.

You will be introduced to our integrated drug, medicine and patient (DMP) teaching blocks in semester two. There will be two core blocks of teaching combined with a variety of hospital-themed placements with a group presentation and a write-up task structured into your timetable.

You will have exams in January and May.

To finish year one, you will undertake a two week professional development or careers focused training session which incorporates everything you have learned from year one.

Semester one

Fundamentals of Pharmacy

You will learn the core skills needed as a pharmacist. You'll understand the role of a pharmacist in healthcare. This is covered through three main areas:

  • Fundamental concepts in science relating to drugs
  • Medicine design
  • Professional and clinical pharmacy

You will be taught how to handle with accuracy and precision the dispensing of medicines, calculations and laboratory skills.

Future responsibilities of a healthcare professional will be introduced. Such as, protection of the public, ensuring the quality, safety and efficacy of medicines, and being an expert in drugs and medicines.

You will learn the different roles of pharmacists in hospitals, primary care organisations, community pharmacies and the pharmaceutical industry. You'll be shown ways of working in interdisciplinary teams to optimise the treatment of patients.

Semester two

Human Life Cycle

The role of the pharmacist in the treatment and prescribing for patients at different stages of the Human Life Cycle.

The topics covered in this teaching block include:

  • Evolutionary basis of sex
  • The physiological basis of sexual attraction
  • Physiological and pharmacokinetic changes during stages of the Human Life Cycle, and their impact on medicines use
  • Conception, contraception and infertility, including ethical and moral considerations
  • Pregnancy - testing and prescribing in
  • Embryo development, sexual differentiation, foetal physiology and nutrition
  • Breast-feeding, nursing, and prescribing for it
  • Children medicines development and prescribing for it
  • Older patients - prescribing and the concept of deprescribing
  • End of life care and prescribing for it
  • The use of off-label and unlicensed medicines
Digestive System

The topics covered in this teaching block include:

  • Anatomy of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and structure and function of the liver
  • How a pharmacist treats and prescribes drugs to patients with GI and liver diseases
  • Influences on absorption of drugs and nutrients within the GI
  • Intestinal and hepatic metabolic pathways 
  • The role of normal GI bacteria
  • Absorption of drugs and the role of dosage form properties that control absorption
  • Identification and evaluation of appropriate methods to optimize oral delivery
  • Identification of potential limits to oral delivery
  • Identification of appropriate types of dosage forms for specific drugs
  • Importance of nutritional therapy in these diseases

Professional competencies year one

In each year of the MPharm there is a professional competencies teaching blocks. All of the competencies are taught in the other core teaching blocks.

These are to confirm that key elements of the course have been assessed and passed.

These are zero-credit teaching blocks that do not contribute to your marks. However, it is a requirement of progression to years 2, 3, 4 and to graduation that these teaching blocks are passed with a mark of 100%.

The above is a sample of the typical modules we offer but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. Modules (including methods of assessment) may change or be updated, or modules may be cancelled, over the duration of the course due to a number of reasons such as curriculum developments or staffing changes. Please refer to the module catalogue for information on available modules. This content was last updated on Monday 01 August 2022.

Teaching blocks

The DMP teaching blocks continue to develop your integrated knowledge and understanding of how medicines work and their safe and effective use. Your professional skills and competencies will continue to develop through training in dispensing, law, ethics and pharmaceutical calculations.

In semester one there will be four core blocks of teaching. There will be a group assessment and exams too.

In semester two there will be four core blocks of teaching. There will be a mix of group and report assessments with exams in May.

Throughout year two you will take part in a variety of hospital and community placements. These visits are structured into your timetable.

To finish year two, you will undertake a two week professional development or career based assessment which incorporates everything you have learned from year two.

Semester one

Infections 1

Antibiotics and antifungals are among the most commonly prescribed drugs used to treat infection. Therefore, it is important that pharmacists understand the underlying principles of these classes of drugs. Antibiotics are amongst the most commonly overprescribed drug by medical professionals. With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens, resulting in a serious threat to global public health.

You will have an appreciation of microbiology and infectious diseases, a deep understanding of the key classes of antimicrobial drugs, and detailed knowledge regarding antibiotic prescribing from a clinical pharmacy perspective.

On completion of the teaching block you should have a clear understanding of these key concepts and your role as pharmacists, as part of the healthcare team, in infection control and tackling global infection health issues.

This teaching block will provide a basic grounding in microbiology, common infectious diseases, mode of action and spectrum of antimicrobial agents, and how these drugs are delivered to and dealt with by the body. The teaching block will also cover antibiotic prescribing and dispensing, and infection control.
Examples of topics within the module include:

  • Common bacterial and fungal infections and current treatment regimes.
  • Targeted antimicrobial chemotherapy.
  • Emerging resistance of microorganisms and future directions for antimicrobial strategies.
  • Tuberculosis infection as a global infection health issue.

The teaching block also uses examples of antibiotics and antifungals to highlight key scientific concepts in the pharmacology, chemistry, ADME and pharmaceuticals of important classes of drugs.

Infections 2

Viruses and Parasites present special challenges for Pharmacists and Pharmaceutical Scientists. There are far less antiviral than anti-bacterial drugs; the same can be said for anthelminthics.

You will learn the basics on biology of viruses, protozan and metazoan parasites.

Pharmacies in the UK sell vaccinations against viral diseases (e.g. HepA, HepB, HPV) as well as prophylactic agents against malaria. You will gain a sound understanding of these pathogens and the drugs or vaccinations available for treatment. Key concepts will be reinforced in practicals and workshops in which you will learn how to design anti-viral drugs in silico and about the role of pharmacists during flu pandemics.

This teaching block aims to get you thinking about the available treatments for important viral and parasitic diseases. It will introduce tools and concepts enabling the quantitative assessment of socioeconomic impact of diseases.

On completion of this teaching block, you will be able to:

  • understand the biological mechanisms employed by parasites to infect their hosts
  • understand how such mechanisms are targeted by drugs
  • understand the mechanisms of action and pharmacological properties of antiviral, antiprotozoan and anti-helminthic drugs
  • describe the therapeutic usefulness of numerous classes of medicine in clinical use
  • advise patients regarding travel medicines and immunisation
  • provide advice on the management and prevention of sexually transmitted infections
  • describe the therapeutic uses of the main antiviral and antiparasitic veterinary medicines.
Autoimmune Diseases

Learn breakthrough research in biology and pharmaceutical sciences underpinning current and future strategies for treating inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease.

You'll learn of the molecular and cellular mechanisms associated with inflammatory disorders.

Optimising and advising about therapies, correct uses of devices and disease self-management will be highlighted to you as a frontline pharmacist. You will be able to assess appropriate management of these disorders in both mechanistic and clinical terms.

Treatment of inflammatory diseases will be illustrated by consideration of rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel diseases. We aim to illustrate molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying these pathological states; how therapeutic intervention is designed to treat these states and how better medicines can be generated for these conditions.

Examples of topics within this teaching block include:

  • The role of inflammatory cells.
  • Current and future pharmacotherapies to treat inflammatory conditions; molecular and cellular targets.
  • Delivery systems for pharmacotherapies and their appropriate usage and supply.
  • The role of the pharmacist in the treatment and management of patients with autoimmune disease .
Respiratory

Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases are amongst the most common disorders encountered by pharmacists which affect the respiratory system. Two other very common disorders both atopy and eczema will be highlighted in this teaching block too.

You'll be able to define the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying these pathological states; how therapeutic intervention is designed to treat these states and how better medicines can be generated for these conditions.

Examples of topics within this teaching block include:

  • The regulation of smooth muscle tone and mucus production; the role of inflammatory cells.
  • Current and future pharmacotherapies to treat respiratory and inflammatory conditions; molecular and cellular targets.
  • Delivery systems (inhalers, etc.) for pharmacotherapies and their appropriate usage and supply.
  • The role of the pharmacist in the treatment and management of patients with respiratory diseases.

Semester two

Renal

Learn the:

  • biology of renal function
  • symptoms of renal diseases
  • Advanced renal pharmacokinetics
  • presentation and management of symptoms relating to renal disease
  • law and ethics relating to renal and endocrine topics - e.g. living organ donors
  • role of the pharmacist in the treatment and management of patients with renal disease

You will know about the symptoms and management of renal diseases and will have a sound knowledge of the underlying, biology, pharmacology and chemistry, including the design of dosing devices and important ethical considerations.

Endocrine

You will be taught about the:

  • biology of endocrine function
  • symptoms of endocrine diseases
  • chemistry and mechanism of action of peptide-based drugs (insulin as a key example)
  • Physical and chemical properties of proteins relevant to formulation and manufacture of insulin products
  • recombinant DNA technology
  • presentation and management of symptoms relating to diabetes disease
  • law and ethics relating to renal and endocrine topics - e.g. performance-enhancing drugs
  • The role of the pharmacist in the treatment and management of patients with endocrine diseases

You will learn a comprehensive coverage of pharmacy-relevant topics relating to endocrine diseases. Will understand how the key biological systems can malfunction to cause disease and how these diseases may be treatable by specific drug therapies. 

Dermatology

Pharmacists are often the first point of contact for patients with mild skin problems. You will learn how to assist, diagnosis and treat patients with skin problems over the counter. You'll learn how to support patients with long term dermatological conditions.

Example of teaching content includes:

  • Detailed patient history taking
  • The formulation science underpinning the use of topical treatments
  • Common skin conditions and infections
  • The use of non-topical treatments for dermatological conditions
  • The role of the pharmacist in the treatment and management of dermatological conditions

Upon completion you will be able to advise patients on self-care of skin conditions, refer patients for specialist investigation, and be able to consider how skin conditions vary according to skin tone.

Cardiovascular

Learn about health and diseases within the cardiovascular system. It includes key drug classes, from their fundamental science through to clinical usage.

Understand the evidence-based medicines which underpins therapeutics for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. As a pharmacist in training, you'll learn evidence-based treatments and support treatments by appropriate patient counselling and lifestyle advice.

There will be case studies based on key problem questions that you will learn and investigate. The emphasis is on you to become self-seeking independent learners, with high level enquiry and critical skills.

Professional competencies year two

In each year of the MPharm there is a professional competencies teaching block. All of the competencies are taught in the other core teaching blocks.

These are to confirm that key elements of the course have been assessed and passed.

These are zero-credit teaching blocks that do not contribute to your marks. However, it is a requirement of progression to years 2, 3, 4 and to graduation that these teaching blocks are passed with a mark of 100%.

The above is a sample of the typical modules we offer but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. Modules (including methods of assessment) may change or be updated, or modules may be cancelled, over the duration of the course due to a number of reasons such as curriculum developments or staffing changes. Please refer to the module catalogue for information on available modules. This content was last updated on

Teaching blocks

In semester one you will continue with the DMP themes, development of your professional skills and competencies and placement visits. There will be three core blocks of teaching. There will be a business group task and a medicine based assessments.

Semester two will be your Research Project and Prescribing teaching. There will be a mix of group and report assessments.

You will have exams in January and May.

Throughout year three you will attend a variety of placements like in a care home/hospice.

To finish year three, you will undertake a two week professional development or career based assessment which incorporates everything you have learned from year three.

Semester one

Pain

Everybody experiences pain at some time and a pharmacist, irrespective of the patient facing setting, encounters patients with pain several times each day. You will be provided with scientific background information to be able to understand and describe the clinical use of commonly used analgesics and targets for novel analgesics. 

You'll discuss legal and ethical issues that contribute to appropriate and illicit analgesic use.

We will cover key aspects of the Interprofessional Pain Curriculum Outline as proposed by the International Association for the Study of Pain.

You'll learn areas such as:

  • Mechanisms of pain transduction and transmission
  • Relevant medicinal chemistry, and pharmacology and therapeutics of commonly used analgesics including paracetamol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)
  • local anaesthetics, opioids, adjuvant analgesics and 5-HT1-receptor agonists (triptans)
  • Epidemiology and presentation of commonly encountered types of pain
  • Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 and ethical issues that you will face when practising as a pharmacist
  • The role of pharmacist in the treatment and prescribing to patients with pain
Central Nervous System (CNS)

Many of the most common and difficult to treat medical conditions affect the CNS and knowledge of how drugs can be used to alleviate these problems is required by all pharmacists.

You will build on these foundations to apply medicine use in complex ethical and therapeutic cases. By learning the key methods and philosophies of healthcare coaching, you will be equipped to conduct difficult mental health conversations.

We will teach you to understand and describe the pathophysiology of CNS disorders, different treatment pathways and the medicines used to treat them in a rational manner.

 

You'll cover areas such as:

  • the basic anatomy and function of the CNS
  • the signs, symptoms and origins of disorders of emotion and thinking
  • neurodegenerative diseases and epilepsy
  • the mechanisms of action and clinical pharmacology of the drugs used in their treatment
  • drugs of abuse and associated approaches to treatment
  • strategies employed to deliver drugs through the blood/brain barrier
  • complex ethical challenges within patients suffering from Mental Health problems, incorporating the Mental Health capacity Act and Pharmacy professional standards
  • advanced consultation skills required for patients suffering from Mental Health problems
Cancers

Address issues relevant to the diagnosis and treatment of cancers, and the professional and ethical issues concerning palliative care and the end of life.

In particular, you will be encouraged to think of cancers as a diverse group of genetic diseases which pose unique problems in their diagnosis and management.

Examples of a small number of cancer types will be used to illustrate key points which have broader relevance to cancer therapy and beyond.

You will cover areas such as:

  • The biological hallmarks of cancer
  • Classes of anti-cancer drug
  • Cancer treatments and formulations
  • Patient management and palliative care
  • Epidemiology and Health Economics
  • The role of the pharmacist in the treatment and management of patients with cancer, and patients at the end-of-life stage

Semester two

Pharmacy Research Project

Experience contemporary research methods by engaging yourself to design a research programme and perform experiments, surveys, or other research activities aimed at solving a specific pharmacy-related or biomedical problem.

The practical component of the project will provide an opportunity for you to carry out scientific research, and to relate the outcomes to scientific concepts and knowledge of the field. You will collect, analyse and interpret data, read and collate previous results relevant to their problem, presenting their research as a clear and concise report.

The form of project may vary and it may be based on laboratory work, clinical audit, or patient studies.

Academic supervisors will provide the topic of study and guidance on the project. You will be able to develop the theme of the dissertation in your own way.

You will be provided with an opportunity to use your initiative and knowledge in undertaking an original research study. With the aim to provide you with first-hand research experience and insights into scientific methodology, through the undertaking of a review of published work and experimental and/or computer-based work to investigate a selected topic, culminating in a written dissertation.

Practical projects are likely to involve the utilization of state-of-the-art instrumentation available in the Schools of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, whereas students undertaking clinical projects may be required to visit practice based settings.

Pharmaceutical Care and Prescribing (PCAP)

You will learn practices to prescribe, this will also consider diagnostics, deprescribing, medicines optimisation, medicines adherence, and transfer of care.

You'll cover areas such as:

  • Law, accountability and ethics of prescribing
  • Prescribing in a public health context
  • Psychology of, and influences on, prescribing
  • Prescribing in a team context
  • Consultation, decision making and therapy including referral
  • Pharmacology and therapeutics
  • Organisational leadership in relation to prescribing
  • Continuing professional development

We will prepare and support you on your journey to being able to prescribe safely and knowledgeably using the British National Formulary and other evidence-based medicines resources, following prescribing competency frameworks. The course will prepare you for future prescribing authority.

Optional

If you complete your research project in Nottingham, you will have 20 credits of optional teaching blocks to choose from. These can be from subjects outside of pharmacy.

Past students have chosen topics such as entrepreneurship, introductory language training, English literature and scientific photography.

Professional competencies year three

In each year of the MPharm there is a professional competencies teaching block. All of the competencies are taught in the other core teaching blocks.

These are to confirm that key elements of the course have been assessed and passed.

These are zero-credit teaching blocks that do not contribute to your marks. However, it is a requirement of progression to years 2, 3, 4 and to graduation that these teaching blocks are passed with a mark of 100%.

The above is a sample of the typical modules we offer but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. Modules (including methods of assessment) may change or be updated, or modules may be cancelled, over the duration of the course due to a number of reasons such as curriculum developments or staffing changes. Please refer to the module catalogue for information on available modules. This content was last updated on

Teaching blocks

The final year prepares you for the foundation training year. You will have DMP teaching blocks on the latest developments in drug discovery and future medicines. You will run a simulated pharmacy and be challenged with simulated patients allowing you to demonstrate your integrated knowledge, and professional and clinical skills.

Throughout year four there will be a mix of group presentations, work based assessments and report assessments.

You will have exams in January and May.

You will attend a variety of hospital, GP and community placements.

After passing everything, you will graduate at the end of year four.

Semester one

Advancing Therapies, Practice and Care 1

You'll join a small team with fellow pharmacy students to understand two core areas:

Simulation

Step in to a simulated environment of a pharmacist. confronted with routine activities, long lasting projects and incidents relating to a fully fledged pharmacy. It takes a:

  • patient-focussed approach to medicine optimisation
  • follow patients through several care pathways
  • prescribe multiple medicines to manage coexisting problems
  • (paid) actors will participate as patients, customers, prescribers and other health care staff, pharmaceutical company representatives, inspectors and so on
  • practice patient care either face-to-face, over a phone or through virtual interactions

You will learn advancement of the knowledge of disease management and conditions covered previously and introduction of new diseases and conditions. You will develop and be supported in  problem-solving skills and your abilities in application of therapeutics to these complex patients.

Hone in on your critical thinking and decision-making, team-working, and teaching skills.

We have a team culture that you will join, learning leadership, management and appraisal from peers and staff to support your future professional roles.

Patient treatment changing over the years

Your career within the pharmacy sector could span over 40 years. During this time there will be major changes in your roles and the types of medicines available to treat patients. In this teaching block, you will be challenged to think about how patient treatment could change over the course of your career and we will help to prepare you for changes by developing  your critical thinking. This is with respect to how new medicines are introduced and how healthcare professionals and scientists can keep their personal knowledge up-to-date. Examples of new medicines that may be considered are:

  • The application of gene therapy and RNA therapeutics to medicine, including examples of successful approaches in clinical trials.
  • New developments in antibody technologies and biosimilars for therapeutics.
  • The potential of stem cell therapies to transform medicine.
  • The application of drug delivery to create targeted therapies for inflammatory diseases, cancer chemotherapy and needle-free vaccine delivery.

Semester two

Advancing Therapies, Practice and Care 2

You will further enhance your knowledge from semester one, continuing to work as a team. Focusing on simulation and being challenged to think about how patient treatment could change over the years. 

You will learn to:

  • advance your skills and knowledge in disease management and medicine optimisation
  • capitalise on experiences gained outside the teaching block such as vocational experiences both within the course and outside
  • enable assessment of new scientific breakthroughs in terms of their clinical potential
  • enable students to deliver patient care, essential, advanced and bespoke services
  • further develop students’ skills in leadership, management, marketing, communication, problem-solving abilities critical thinking, teaching and learning, and team-working
  • provide an appreciation of the research breakthroughs in biology and pharmaceutical sciences that are driving the invention of future medicines

Professional competencies year four

In each year of the MPharm there is a professional competencies teaching block. All of the competencies are taught in the other core teaching blocks.

These are to confirm that key elements of the course have been assessed and passed.

These are zero-credit teaching blocks that do not contribute to your marks. However, it is a requirement of progression to years 2, 3, 4 and to graduation that these teaching blocks are passed with a mark of 100%.

The above is a sample of the typical modules we offer but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. Modules (including methods of assessment) may change or be updated, or modules may be cancelled, over the duration of the course due to a number of reasons such as curriculum developments or staffing changes. Please refer to the module catalogue for information on available modules. This content was last updated on

PharmSoc is the student-run society for students in the School of Pharmacy. They organise academic and social events such as career talks, pizza and quiz nights, and the popular PharmSoc Ball.

Fees and funding

UK students

£9,250
Per year

International students

To be confirmed in 2022*
Keep checking back for more information

*For full details including fees for part-time students and reduced fees during your time studying abroad or on placement (where applicable), see our fees page.

If you are a student from the EU, EEA or Switzerland, you may be asked to complete a fee status questionnaire and your answers will be assessed using guidance issued by the UK Council for International Student Affairs (UKCISA) .

Additional costs

All students will need at least one device to approve security access requests via Multi-Factor Authentication (MFA). We also recommend students have a suitable laptop to work both on and off-campus. For more information, please check the equipment advice.

As a student on this course, you should factor some additional costs into your budget, alongside your tuition fees and living expenses, including a DBS check. See a full list of additional costs for this course. If you study abroad, you will need to consider the costs of travel and living expenses in the country that you choose.

You should be able to access most of the books you’ll need through our libraries, though you may wish to purchase your own copies.

Due to our commitment to sustainability, we don’t print lecture notes but these are available digitally. You will be given £5 worth of printer credits a year. You are welcome to buy more credits if you need them. It costs 4p to print one black and white page.

Scholarships and bursaries

Home students*

Over one third of our UK students receive our means-tested core bursary, worth up to £1,000 a year. Full details can be found on our financial support pages.

* A 'home' student is one who meets certain UK residence criteria. These are the same criteria as apply to eligibility for home funding from Student Finance.

International students

We offer a range of international undergraduate scholarships for high-achieving international scholars who can put their Nottingham degree to great use in their careers.

International scholarships

Careers

Foundation training in employment (previously Pre-registration)

To complete your training and qualify as a registered, practising pharmacist you will need to complete the new GPhC Foundation training programme. This replaces the pre-registration placement year and has been designed as a universal programme to evidence skills across five key areas of professional practice, communication and collaborative working, leadership and management, education and research.

It brings pharmacists more in line with other healthcare professionals like medics and dentists. At the end of the year, you'll sit the General Pharmaceutical Council’s exam to become a qualified pharmacist. For the first time this also includes registration to become a Prescribing Pharmacist.

Our progressive and responsive course and teaching will help prepare you for the next stages in your training and career. Targeted support is given by a highly experienced specialised team of academic and professional staff, many of whom who are involved in shaping and advising the pharmacy profession at a national level.

We also have the MPharm Pharmacy (with Integrated Pre registration Scheme) course. This is the same as the MPharm course but includes equivalent training to the Foundation year as part of the course, and hence directly supported by and managed by the University.

Being a professional pharmacist

You could work as a pharmacist in the community, at a GP surgery or in a hospital. On the course, you'll experience the different types of pharmacy work so you can see what you enjoy the most.

Industrial pharmacy

If you are interested in the research and development of new drugs, you may consider industrial pharmacy. Industrial pharmacists work with scientists in other areas to discover safe and effective drugs.

Other roles

Your skills can be used in roles such as:

  • pharmacy research
  • veterinary pharmacy
  • regulatory pharmacy
  • drug discovery
  • medicines manufacture

Average starting salary and career progression

94.3% of undergraduates from the School of Pharmacy secured graduate level employment or further study within 15 months of graduation. The average annual salary for these graduates was £34,037.*

*HESA Graduate Outcomes 2021. The Graduate Outcomes % is derived using The Guardian University Guide methodology. The average annual salary is based on graduates working full-time within the UK.

Studying for a degree at the University of Nottingham will provide you with the type of skills and experiences that will prove invaluable in any career, whichever direction you decide to take.

Throughout your time with us, our Careers and Employability Service can work with you to improve your employability skills even further; assisting with job or course applications, searching for appropriate work experience placements and hosting events to bring you closer to a wide range of prospective employers.

Have a look at our careers page for an overview of all the employability support and opportunities that we provide to current students.

The University of Nottingham is consistently named as one of the most targeted universities by Britain’s leading graduate employers (Ranked in the top ten in The Graduate Market in 2013-2020, High Fliers Research).

General Pharmaceutical Council

This course is accredited by the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC). This means that you can apply for registration with them once you've completed your degree and pre-registration training

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" The School of Pharmacy has excellent connections to the industry, which helped me secure a summer placement with Boots. "
Bianca, MPharm Pharmacy

Related courses

Important information

This online prospectus has been drafted in advance of the academic year to which it applies. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information is accurate at the time of publishing, but changes (for example to course content) are likely to occur given the interval between publishing and commencement of the course. It is therefore very important to check this website for any updates before you apply for the course where there has been an interval between you reading this website and applying.